Butter Archive #9: Annotated Bibliography

Works Cited and Referenced:

Anthony, Jessica, and Rodrigo Corral. Chopsticks. Computer Software. Apple App Store. Vers. 1.0. Penguin Group, 2012. Web.
<https://itunes.apple.com/ca/app/chopsticks-novel/id497983366?mt=8 >

  • The story of a teenage girl named Glory who is training to become a world class pianist and her relationship with Frank, a teenage boy who moves in next to her, while simultaneously weaving in the story of how Glory has gone missing. Told only in photographs, and now converted into an app, it promises that it “draws on a full spectrum of media to create a fully immersive novel experience.”

Anthony, Jessica, and Rodrigo Corral. Chopsticks. New York: Razorbill, 2012. Print.

  • The story of a teenage girl named Glory who is training to become a world class pianist and her relationship with Frank, a teenage boy who moves in next to her, while simultaneously weaving in the story of how Glory has gone missing. The print version will be used as a contrast study to the app version.

Bolter, Jay D. Writing Space. Second ed. London: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers, 2001. Print.

  • In this comprehensive study on the relationship between print and new media, Jay David Bolter examines the changing sphere of publishing, especially in relation to hypertext. The chapter “The Electronic Book” is of specific interest, as it explores the changing concept of books, how “various electronic devices pay homage to the printed codex and other paper-based materials, while at the same time aiming to supersede them,” (79) the importance that ebooks are connected to the internet and therefore a limitless resource, and other key staples of ebooks.

Chivers, Tom. “Stephen King has the wrong villain – it’s not the ebook.” The Telegraph. N.p., 22 May 2013. Web. 23 Oct. 2015. <http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/tomchiversscience/100218225/stephen-king-has-the-wrong-villain-its-not-the-ebook/ >.

  • This opinion piece looks at Stephen King’s refusal to publish his novel Joyland in ebook format and reflects on why it would be something an author would want to do (to discourage the extinction of bookstores) but also why it isn’t a very effective way to protest.

Jabr, Farris. “The Reading Brain in the Digital Age: The Science of Paper versus Screens.” Scientific American. N.p., 11 Apr. 2013. Web. 23 Oct. 2015. <http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/reading-paper-screens/ >.

  • Starting with commentary about a video of a baby who mimicked similar actions on a physical magazine that she did on an iPad and the anti-technology arguments that followed, this article explores how human interaction with screens and paper differ. Of specific interest is the examination of information locality and how “people report that when trying to locate a particular piece of written information they often remember where in the text it appeared” but then how “in contrast, most screens… interfere with intuitive navigation of a text and inhibit people from mapping the journey in their minds.”

Ludovico, Alessandro. Post-Digital Print. Rotterdam: Onomatopee 77, 2012. Print.

  • Ludovico puts together a history of printing since 1894, with an emphasis on how digital publications are affecting publishing. He talks about the importance of “hybrid publications,” (156) those which mix print and e-print.

Mangen, Anne. “Reading linear texts on paper versus computer screen: Effects on reading comprehension.” International Journal of Educational Research 58 (2012). Web. 23 Oct. 2015. <http://www.kau.se/sites/default/files/Dokument/event/2012/12/mangen_a_2013_reading_linear_texts_on_paper_ve_14552.pdf >.

  • Anne Mangen performed a study of 72 tenth grade students who where assessed on their reading comprehension on computer screens versus paper sources by having them read the same excerpt and then testing them on what they could recall. This is an incredibly useful study as it opens the conversation as to whether or not reading digitally is as effective as reading a physical copy of a text.

Mendelson, Peter. What We See When We Read: Interactive Edition. New York: Penguin Random House, 2014. Print.

  • An exploration into the psychology behind reading, specifically how we create the images of characters and settings in our minds while reading descriptions (or lack there of). This “interactive edition” includes animations, sound effects, and full colour imagery to better emphasize the original text.

Rowling, J K. Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone. N.p.: Pottermore, 2015. Print.

  • The story of a young boy who learns he is a wizard and is taken to a school of wizardry where adventures ensue. Originally published in 1997, this new version has been published in 2015 specifically for iBooks, promoted as an “enhanced edition,” which includes illustrations, animations, interactions, and annotations from the author.

Stevenson, Noelle, and Grace Ellis. Lumberjanes #1. Los Angeles: Boom! Box, 2014. Print.

  • A comic book about five best friends who go to a summer camp and have friendship building adventures. This will be used as an exploration of graphics on a screen when compared to graphics in print.

Stevenson, Noelle, and Grace Ellis. Lumberjanes #18. Los Angeles: Boom! Box, 2015. Print.

  • A comic book about five best friends who go to a summer camp and have friendship building adventures. This will be used as an exploration of graphics in print when compared to graphics on a screen.

Thompson, John B. Books in the Digital Age. Cornwall: Polity Press, 2005. Print.

  • In Books in the Digital Age John Thompson creates a study and myth-busting of how electronic publishing has affected the publishing of books. He encourages the reader to look at elements outside of publishing that have encouraged the move to electronic books.

Watercutter, Angela. “Publishers Hustle to Make E-Books More Immersive.” Wired. N.p., 9 Apr. 2012. Web. 23 Oct. 2015.
<http://www.wired.com/2012/04/future-of-ebooks/ >.

  • In her often cited article, Angela Watercutter explains the hurdles that publishers are having to tackle in an attempt to take full advantage of the ebook medium. She compares the movement like that of radio to TV, and explains some of the specific problems (big budgets, cross-platform formatting) that currently stand in the way.

Summary:
I’ve amassed three groupings of citations. The first is a mixture of physical and electronic pieces of media that I hope to use in a hands-on contrasting and examining of ebooks versus paper books. I’ve chosen a comic book to examine the opportunities for graphics on screens, a photo-novel that incorporates video and animation, an “enhanced” novel, and an “interactive edition” of a non-fiction work, all in hopes of exploring the many different allowances of the medium. The second are studies and articles about the actual abilities and nuances of ebooks, such as studies on reading retention and books exploring how connectivity to the internet has changed what we expect from texts. Thirdly, I have a few responses to the rise of ebooks, including an author reaction and varied responses on the effects of ebooks in publishing. When all things are considered, the general tone and sentiment is one of uneasiness. It is obvious that publishers, authors, and readers alike are all aware that ebooks are here but that no one knows exactly how ebooks will coexist with physical books and what unique opportunities they can offer. I want to focus my paper on that uneasiness and consider what could be achieved if ebooks were more readily and happily embraced.

____

Word count of summary: 210
Word count of annotated bibliography: 1180

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