Fitzpatrick and Authorship

The idea of sharing my writing has always been difficult for me. Writing is such a personal process, and receiving input or constructive criticisms felt like a judgement against myself, rather than my writing (wrong. So wrong). Reading Fitzpatrick’s confessions about her writing process was relieving and refreshing. An author actually has the same writing struggles as undergrad students. But pushing past those insecurities in order to collaborate will help us to achieve our best work. After reading Fitzpatrick’s chapter, I began to appreciate the time we have to work on our final projects more. The peer editing process will allow us to incorporate other opinions to better our work, which we very rarely (if ever) get the chance to do in other courses.

I liked Fitzpatrick’s concepts about digital writing becoming piece that we come into conversation with. The focus does not remain on the final, polished piece. We incorporate comments, the author’s collaboration with other texts, even spelling mistakes that shape our interpretation of the text, and how we interact with it. Thinking about the blog I kept while I was travelling, I can relate to Fitzpatrick’s findings. I was often writing blog posts on a plane, or late at night, trying to quickly include everything from the day. In that process, though, I rarely edited before I published a post. When I would go back to it the next day, I would find spelling mistakes and sometimes missing words that I didn’t notice. But this was all part of the process of what I was trying to convey. They were raw posts, reflecting how confused or scatter-brained I felt, which I didn’t think about until I read Fitzpatrick’s chapter.

I was relieved to hear that my fellow classmates shared similar writing anxieties, particularly when it came to collaboration. Does anyone have any reservations about the peer-editing that Fitzpatrick brought to light? And why is it that we feel so protective about our writing?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s